How to Remove Make-up Stains from Clothing:

 The worst thing you could do is grab a cloth and begin furiously rubbing at the stains as doing this will only make matters worse. Take your time and identify the product. Is it an oily type of makeup, such as lipstick or eyeliner? Or is it a non-oily powder, such as blush or eye shadow?

Eyeliner Stain on Clothing

           Use hairspray! Just spray the affected area with hairspray then get one of those spray bottles filled with water and     spray it on top. Scrub it with something like an old and the stain will be gone. 


Mascara Stain on Clothing

Start by treating the oily/waxy component of the stain with a pre-treater like Shout, Spray 'n' Wash or any stain remover. Then rub with heavy-duty liquid detergent or a paste made of powdered detergent and water. Scrub stain lightly and rinse in hot water. Next, wash in the hottest water suitable for the fabric using detergent and an all-fabric bleach to remove the dye in the stain. If the garment is dry clean only, point out and identify the stain to your professional cleaner.

RE: Lipstick Stain on Clothing

Often, Rubbing Alcohol will remove lipstick stains. Dab the stain with a small amount of Isopropyl Alcohol, then add a small amount of household detergent, and wash the garment per label care instructions. Household ammonia is another good resource for removing lipstick.  First blot the stain with a bit of water to remove as much of the lipstick as possible, then treat with a little ammonia, and rinse and wash per care label instructions.  Do not use ammonia on silk or wool!

Some authorities claim that hairspray works well on removing lipstick stains. Spray a little hairspray on the stain, let stand a few minutes, and then wipe off the hairspray with your white cloth. Rinse, and launder per label care instructions.

Foundation Stain on Clothing

           Shaving cream and rubbing alcohol. Just work in with fingers then use tooth brush to really work it out.

Emergency Wedding Dress Stains

Red Wine:

           Use a white towel to absorb as much of the stain as possible. Dab gently with a white cloth soaked in warm water from the outer edges of the stain to the middle. Cover any remaining stain with chalk or baby powder.

Oily Food or Grease:

           Dust stain with baby powder to absorb oil, and then gently brush away. Wet a cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and dab from the outer edges of the stain to the middle. Cover any remaining stain with chalk or baby powder.

Ink:

           Dab at outer edges of the stain toward the middle with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. Blot with a clean    white cloth. Protect the underside of the dress with an additional white cloth to help absorb the ink. Cover any remaining stain with chalk or baby powder.

Lipstick or Make Up: Try a stain removal wipe, dabbing at the stain. Cover remaining stain with chalk or baby powder.

Blood:                          Use tepid water to blot at the stain from the outer edges toward the center.

  Five Makeup Tips: 

1    Your foundation must match your skin tone perfectly, if it does not, all is not necessarily lost, you could then use your face powders to find one that matches your skin tone. This will most likely remedy the problem of foundation that does not perfectly match your skin tone. Blend your foundation all the way down to your blouse or dress neckline. Use face primer under your foundation to help it blend.

 

2    It is better to start your makeup session with eye makeup first, then followed by concealer, foundation and powder. This way you can wipe off excess makeup fallout before you apply your concealer and foundation. Alternatively, if you are in the habit of starting with foundation first, then leave off the powder until after you have finished with the eye makeup. This way you can clean up under the eyes before you apply your face powder.

 

3    There are a few ways to get your liquid or pencil eyeliner symmetrical when extending it beyond the outer corner of the eye. One is to use sellotape, aligning it from the outer corner of the eye to eyebrow end, then use the top edge of the sellotape as your guide to draw in your line. This can also be used as a way to avoid eye shadow fallout below that area. The other way is to draw a line in with a white eyeliner pencil, which is easily wiped away with a Q-tip, after you have drawn in your line above your white line. You can also use a makeup brush or folded tissue, aligning it from the outer corner of the eye to eyebrow end, as your guideline to draw in your liquid or pencil eyeliner.

 

4    You do not have to use one colour on the lips, you can use two or more colours, either mixing them all to make one colour, or deliberately applying colours to show each colour off on the lips.

 

5    You do not have to use only black or brown eyeliner or mascara. You can experiment with any colours of your choice. Try using silver or gold liquid eyeliners, close to your lash roots. You could even use them simultaneously with practice, one above the other close to your lash line. You could use violet eyeliner or mascara. This brings out the green in your eyes.


A recent article in Noseweek magazine highlighted controversies around the level of protection offered by sunscreens on the South African market.


Nailmetics CC, distributors of COVERDERM Filteray Derma and Prime Line ranges of sun protection products in South Africa summarises the debate:

The Noseweek article highlighted these facts: UVA rays from the sun were previously thought to be harmless, but they are now known to be as damaging, if not more damaging to skin than UVB rays.



CANSA (The Cancer Association of South Africa) recently commissioned research to establish whether sunscreens on the South African market provide protection from UVA rays and to determine the level of photo stability of products in line with standards set out by the European Cosmetic, Toiletry and Perfumery Association (COLIPA).



The sample of sunscreens tested included a mix of local and imported products, some with the CANSA seal of approval and some without.



Although the study looked at a limited number of products, it did include samples from sunscreen lines produced locally by the three sunscreen brand leaders in South Africa. Collectively these companies produce 87% of sunscreen products sold over 12 months up to March 2011.



The tests revealed that many of the sunscreens are “not optimal” in providing protection against the sun.



Even though these sunscreens do not provide optimal protection from cancer-causing rays of the sun, some of them carry the CANSA seal of approval.



South African consumers could be purchasing sunscreens in good faith, expecting them to provide optimal protection from the sun for the summer 2012/13 season, when they in fact do not.



CANSA has informed South African sunscreen manufacturers that they have until March 2013 to clear existing stock, after which they will be compelled change their product composition to meet the standard in order to keep their CANSA seal of approval. From April 2013 CANSA will change the name of their approval of products to the SunSmart Seal.



The article also mentions that the recently published ISO24443 will be used as the standard that all sunscreens must meet from April 2013.

The Tight Line!

MakeUp4Art's opinion re the tightline ......


The first time I saw a tutorial on TV on how to do a "tight line" inside the top lashes, I cringed ... and I still cringe every time a client asks me to do her makeup this way... and I doubt any makeup college is teaching this method (at least I hope not!)


If you INSIST I'll do it for you, but I am dead against it for so many reasons:

 

Unsafe - Especially if you wear contacts and especially if your liner is past its expiry date. If you do it yourself and not used to doing it, you could end up poking your eye or drawing onto the sensitive waterline prompting tears and destroying your eye makeup.

Blurred Vision - Product can travel to your pupils and blur your vision.

Uncomfortable - Especially if you have blue eyes, your eyes will tear.

Unflattering - does nothing for your eyes.

Small Eyes - Makes your eyes smaller - the last thing most of us need!

Double small eyes - Makes your eyes double smaller if you also line your waterline (inside lower lashes).

Smokey Eyes Smearing - If you tight line, then you cannot line the lower waterline too without it smearing under eyes, due to the two waterlines touching when you blink.

Gunk in the corners - Doubles your chances for black liner to accumulate into the inner corners of your eyes - Yuk!

Panda Eyes - Doubles the chances for your makeup to smudge. Even if you do it neatly to avoid your waterline and eye, the liner will still travel there soon enough, if not immediately.


Pic above courtesy of http://theeverydaybeauty.blogspot.com/2012/02/eyeliner-techniques-such-as-tightlining.html

Mineral makeup - pros and cons

 http://www.organic-nature-news.com/mineral-makeup.html

More and more companies are discovering the skin-enhancing benefits of mineral makeup. Many even claim that minerals are good for the skin. Many spas and salons carry their own versions of mineral cosmetics. Competition is certainly growing. Consumers are now faced with an array of mineral and hybrid makeup choices. In order to be able to determine whether these products are good for you, we would like to provide you with a few facts.

A few naturally-occurring elements protect skin. Zinc oxide for example, is a natural sunblock. It is found in many products, from diaper rash ointments to lip balms. Titanium dioxide also blocks UVA and UVB rays. Iron oxide adds some color. Mica and malachite particles reflect light off the skin, and can appear to minimize fine lines. Silica absorbs oil.

The minerals used in cosmetics are the same grade; the difference lies in the milling process. More finely ground minerals produce a fine, silky texture. Loose powder is the purest form, and should be applied evenly with a natural-bristle brush. A moisturizer should be applied, to help it adhere to skin. Pressed powder and liquid form use more additives, and should be applied with a synthetic-bristle brush. The beauty of mineral cosmetics is the fact that they sit on the skin, rather than being absorbed by it. Thus, they enhance the look of the skin while allowing it to breathe. Conventional cosmetics contain ingredients that are absorbed into the skin.

So what makes mineral makeup different from other cosmetics that use these ingredients? For one thing, there are no synthetic dyes, harmful chemicals, talcs, or perfumes. This can be good news for those of us who suffer from allergies and skin sensitivity.

Is a Mineral Makeup Your Best Foundation Choice?

http://howskinworks.com/is-a-mineral-makeup-your-best-foundation-choice/

Mineral makeup isn’t new — minerals have been used as cosmetics throughout history.

  • The ancient Egyptians and others used kohl (sometimes derived from a mineral) as an eyeliner and eye shadow.
  • Titanium dioxide has been a popular lipsticks ingredient, and is still used in makeup today, even though it has been labelled a possible carcinogen.
  • Ancient Greeks used lead powders to lighten the skin, not a particularly good choice since the lead sometimes caused disfigurement or death. Other cultures also wore lead powders, but some researchers feel that amounts used were slight – enough lead to offer antibacterial protection, but not concentrated enough to cause harm to the wearer.

Today, we often associate mineral makeup with the ever-growing number of loose “powder” foundations on the market, but mineral formulations are available compounded in other way — liquids and pressed versions are two choices. Eye shadows, eyeliners and blushes are other products that may have mineral contents.

A Few FAQ about Mineral Makeup

Is it True that Mineral Makeup is a Healthy Makeup?

Infomercials and web sites tout mineral makeup as the healthy foundation choice, but some skin care pros disagree, and others say, “it depends.” Even though nearly all mineral makeup manufacturers refer to their products as more “pure” than typical foundations, ingredients vary, and in some cases they are simply a powdered form of the same foundation we’ve used for decades.

Does Mineral Makeup Offer Sun Protection?

Most mineral makeup companies claim their products offer protection from UV rays of the sun, and Bare Minerals even displays the Skin Cancer Foundation’s seal of approval on its web site. It varies, but the typical mineral makeup offers an SPF rating of about 15, often due to two well known sunscreen ingredients — titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Dermatologists feel that wearing mineral makeup alone does not offer enough sun protection.

What Are the Some of the Ingredients I Might See Listed on Mineral Makeup Labels?

  • Allantoin – a skin protectant that may help stimulate tissue growth
  • Boron nitride – helps mask the appearance of fine lines; lubricates
  • Dimethicone – an emollient that provides glide
  • Ferric ferrocyanide – a colorant, Prussian blue
  • Mica – a mineral that provides a light-reflecting quality to mineral makeup
  • Iron oxides – metals used to provide varying colors to makeup
  • Kaolin – clay, it offers coverage and a creamy texture
  • Rice powder – a smoothing ingredient used in place of talc or cornstarch
  • Titanium dioxide – a white pigment that offers a matte finish and UV protection; may be carcinogenic
  • Ultramarine blue – a colorant derived from the gemstone lapis lazuli.

Mineral Makeup Pros

  • Mineral makeup is often formulated without fragrances, binders, dyes and preservatives (the minerals act as a preservative), which eliminates ingredients often associated with skin irritation.
  • Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are somewhat anti-inflammatory, and some dermatologists believe they could help people who have issues with rosacea or acne.
  • Mineral makeup tends to be non-comedongenic, meaning it will not clog pores.
  • Available in numerous shades — handy to use as either camouflage or corrective makeup.

Mineral Makeup Cons

  • Many brands of mineral makeup contain talc and synthetic fillers that do indeed create problems for many customers; some makeup lines contain parabens, chemical preservatives that many people wish to avoid.
  • Some types of mineral makeup can be drying, which makes wrinkles more noticeable.
  • Some companies use varying amounts of bismuth oxychloride in their formulas, a skin irritant that’s a byproduct of lead and copper processing (always remember that not all “natural” ingredients are good for you).
  • Some brands use microscopic (or nanoparticle) sized minerals. The process may make minerals dangerous if inhaled, and irritating to sensitive skin.

Bottom Line

Read labels and research unfamiliar ingredients. Be aware that a cosmetic company can call a product mineral makeup even if it contains only small amounts of a mineral. Steer clear of mineral makeup companies that claim it’s okay to sleep in their products – that’s a red flag to move on to another brand.

The following loose mineral foundation ingredients were listed on company web sites in late 2011; check to determine if formulations have changed.

glominerals
Triple-milled high-pigment minerals, and an advanced antioxidant complex of Vitamins A, C, and E and green tea extract, glōminerals provides broad-spectrum UV protection and helps to defend against free radical damage, to deliver a radiant, healthy complexion. In addition, glominerals formulas are talc-free, non-comedogenic and free of perfumes and chemical dyes.

Sheer Cover
Active Ingredients: Zinc Oxide (12.00%). Other Ingredients: Boron Nitride, Bisabolol, Aspalathus Linearis Leaf Extract, May Contain (+/-): Mica, Bismuth Oxychloride (CI 77163), Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499)

Bare Minerals
Active Ingredients: Titanium Dioxide 12.6%, Zinc Oxide 21%. Inactive Ingredients: Bismuth Oxychloride, Mica, Iron Oxides, Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide

Everyday Minerals
Mica, Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Iron Oxides. May contain: Ultramarines.

Alice Cosmetics
Mica, titanium dioxide, iron oxides, zinc oxide, boron nitride, ultramarine blue, kaolin, magnesium stearate, rice powder, ferric ferrocyanide, allantoin. Alice Cosmetics does not use bismuth oxychloride, talc, parabens, cornstarch, nanoparticles, fillers, oils, vitamins, or fragrances.http://howskinworks.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Greenery.png

Jane Iredale
Active Ingredients: Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891) 14%; Zinc Oxide (CI 77947) 6%; Ingredients: Mica (CI 77019); Boron Nitride; Zinc Stearate; Dimethicone; Stearic Acid; Plankton Extract; Algae Extract; Punica Granatum (Pomegranate) Extract; May Contain: Iron Oxides (CI 77489; CI 77491; CI 77492; CI 77499); Ultramarines (CI 77007); Chromium Oxide Greens (CI 77288)

Prescriptives All Skins Mineral Makeup
Could not locate ingredients; web site states no oil, talc or fragrances.

 Makeup Artist Career Advice 

QUESTION:

  • I am in the middle of a crisis in trying to decide what career path to choose. My passions are the beauty industry, particularly make up, but I hate the fact that you have to work weekends, unless I do it on my own and I choose my work hours? ... I’m stuck between trying to decide on what to do and what other options I have. Can you give me any advice about the makeup industry?

 

REPLY:

Makeup artists do not earn a lot of money, because most of their money comes from brides who mainly get married on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays - and there are only so many weeks in one year. Happy brides, tell more brides to be, and then 'word of mouth' does the rest to attract more bridal inquiries.

Very often you get asked to do makeup free of charge, in exchange for photos of your work on CD, or in exchange for credit in a magasine or credit at a fashion show. Or family and friends will expect your service for free. Most makeup artists cannot afford to work for free, even if they benefit in other ways.

Television and film pays, but those jobs don't come along regularly. Plus your advertising and products cost you a lot. Even if you sell makeup, you don't get enough orders to increase your lifestyle.

It’s only once you have made a name for yourself by winning awards, or doing makeup for celebs, or written a book, that you start to be taken seriously and are then deliberately sought out. That’s when 'word of mouth' really starts to work for you.

Those of us makeup artists who survive in the industry, usually have another form of income like selling products or writing a book, (although there have already been so many books written on makeup and beauty) - or support, like parents or a husband with a good job.

On top of that, each year thousands of girls and boys matriculate, of which a large percentage want to become makeup artists. So each year you instantly have mega competition. It’s not necessarily how experienced they are, it’s also how well they market themselves and how naturally talented they are.

So a very inexperienced makeup artist who has just finished matric and done a quick makeup course, and has talent and marketing skills is able to compete with makeup artists who have been doing it for years or decades.

Once you start earning over a certain amount per year you will need to declare it to SARS and pay tax.

I always tell my own children and other kids, that you must choose a career you know you will enjoy, because you might want or need to do that for the rest of your life.

There are advantages to being employed by somebody else, but for me the opportunity arose to work for myself. My second piece of advice is, no matter what career you choose, it is very often better if you can grab any opportunities that may allow you to be your own boss or write your own cheque. There is an element of freedom and power in that.

MakeUp4Art

Pro's & Con's of Airbrushed Make-up ...

by MakeUp4Art ... opinion

Personally I am not a fan of airbrush make-up. It is a fallacy that it creates a "flawless look"; this is used to sell the airbrush machines. Perhaps my first experience with airbrush makeup done on me by another makeup artist is what scared me off .... I looked baaaaad.

 

The airbrushed foundation application is as good as your skin and the skill of the makeup artist operating the machine. Likewise foundation application by hand is also as good as your skin and the skill of the person who is applying it. A good makeup artist can take the cheapest foundation and make it look flawless on a good skin, and also make it last as long on your skin, if she is skilful enough.

 

You can read more on the pros and cons of airbrushing further on.

 

Originally airbrush makeup was created for theatre make-up where many actors needed make-up fast and where the audience sees the actors from afar. For theatre it is great, but not for up close, and certainly not for a bride who really does want to look flawless.

You cannot use your favorite foundation with the airbrush machine; you must use the foundation that comes with the machine. A good makeup artist will choose a foundation according to your skin type.

 

There are techniques to hand applied makeup that you cannot do with the airbrush machine. I can get the skin almost flawless. The rest I leave up to the photographer. I need the tog, the tog needs me, and you the bride needs us both, because your wedding photos are forever!

 

The make-up artist and photographer with the help of his /her post editing, work together to get your look flawless.

 

When you choose your photographer, first make sure he or she includes post-editing in the package.

 

Post editing removes anything that the make-up artist was not able to hide. Many photographers don't like to post edit because it is time consuming and time is money - the truth is the difference is sometimes painfully obvious when there has been no post editing.


MakeUp4Art

 Beginnings of airbrush:

 http://www.cwanswers.com/8921/airbrush_makeup


Airbrush makeup became popular in the 1930s when MGM used it for painting hundreds of "Ben Hur" extras. Since then, it has become the most efficient way of quickly painting larger numbers of people.

 

Basic ingredients:

 Airbrush makeup is similar to paint. It has the same components, but of cosmetic quality. Airbrush makeup is a mixture of four basic ingredients: Pigments; Resins; Solvents; and Additives.

 

Pigment is usually a finely ground powder which does not dissolve. It is suspended in a liquid to become the coloring in the airbrush makeup. Pigments include: Chromium Oxide Green; D&C Red #6 Barium Lake, Red #7 Calcium Lake, Red #28, Yellow #10; FD&C Yellow #5, Red #40, Red #28, Blue #1; Iron Oxides, Talc, Titanium Dioxide, Ultramarine Blue, or Ultramarine Pink.

 

Resin (also known as the Binder) is the agent that makes the pigment stick to the surface being painted. The highest quality resin used in water based airbrush makeup is 100% Acrylic. Together, pigment and resins create the paint film.

 

Solvent (also known as the Vehicle) is the liquid that suspends the pigment and resin and transports them. The solvent then evaporates and leaves the paint film behind. Solvents in airbrush makeup can be water or oil based. The less solvent in the airbrush makeup the higher the quality and the better the coverage.

 

An additive is a substance that is added to change or improve paint characteristics. In the case of airbrush makeup, additives are commonly added to improve how the airbrush makeup flows, to make it adhere better and to limit mildew growth.

 

Chemical concerns: Some beginners might use airbrush paint on the skin. You should NEVER use acrylics on humans, ALWAYS use “face” paint. Some people have sensitivities and might be allergic or have reactions to the drying additives in the makeup (Triethanolamine, SD Alcohol) or to the preservatives (Diazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, and Propylparaben).

 

 Airbrush Make-up - How it’s used:

A small amount of a very thin makeup designed for air brush use is put into a chamber of a gun. When the machine is turned on and the gun trigger pulled, a light spray of makeup comes out of the gun in a fine mist.

Most women confuse “airbrush” with makeup, when it is actually a technique used in Photoshop, a picture alteration program, to make the models look flawless.

The actual makeup product does not make or break the look, regardless of what makeup medium is used. It is the artist and their method alone that truly create long-lasting, flawless and impeccable beauty, and therefore should be considered with more care than the product used - D. Amelia Cline.


 Comments from make-up artists re airbrushing:

·      Minimal use of foundation, it covers well, acne also, with an even skin tone.

 ·      Barely feels like anything is on your skin.

 ·      Fun to use.

 ·      Sits on the skin instead of being rubbed in.

 ·      Stays on long comes off easily with makeup remover.

 ·      Does not require powder, which can be ageing if you use cheaper products.

 ·      Some foundation formulations are silicone based; silicone is as smooth as silk.

 ·      Dewy - If you have dry skin it makes your skin feel as if it has lotion on.

 ·      Doesn't spatter everywhere as you may think, although some types can get into

        your hair.

 ·      If you get “PRO” it comes with blush and bronzer, plus speeds to use tanner

        on your skin (has to be their brand though).   

 ·      Skin looks creamy instead of powdery like Bare Minerals etc.

 ·      Doesn't come off easily with sweat.

 

·        The motor injection air brush makeup: is a technique that I use mostly for TV and media work. It looks fine on the film and screen as well as body painting. But it looks pasty up close and in real life and I don’t like to use it for brides. Why we use it so much on films? Because it is fast and easy since in film industry we don't have much time to apply a fully-cared application.


·        Is air brush makeup recommended for brides? When it comes to weddings, I put so much extra care, because it is a once a life time event. So I use the best product and the proper application to avoid any risks of skin rash caused by strange chemicals that maybe in some products. I also make sure that my safe products can also create a fantastic flawless look up-close as well as on the print and film. My recommendation for the bridal makeup is a line of professional products that are safe, flash proof, stay-on, and manually brushed or sponged on the skin. As far as air brush makeup goes I only recommend only a certain type of canned air brush makeup which I use in some occasions. I do not recommend any air injector air brush makeup for a bridal application. In my opinion and experience it looks heavy on the face, the products are risky (skin rash) and it does not hold as well as some other products. Just because it is called air brush makeup, doesn’t mean it creates air brushed and flawless look.

           

·        Dry rubbing won’t make it transfer; on the other hand, if it does become wet thru crying or sweating, you run the risk of it streaking … with airbrush makeup, if the makeup for any reason gets wet and leaves a streak, there is nothing than can be done to blend it.

 

·        Even airbrushing over the area will not blend the streak. The solution to this problem is to constantly be aware of any wetness and to maintain it throughout the day by dabbing your tear ducts and remaining cool so you don’t sweat heavily.

 

www.makeupartistpro.com


 ·     The motor injection air brush makeup: is a technique that I use mostly for TV and media work. It looks fine on the film and screen as well as body painting. But it looks pasty up close and in real life and I don’t like to use it for brides. Why we use it so much on films? Because it is fast and easy since in film industry we don't have much time to apply a fully-cared application.

 

·    Is air brush makeup recommended for brides? When it comes to weddings, I put so much extra care, because it is a once a life time event. So I use the best product and the proper application to avoid any risks of skin rash caused by strange chemicals that maybe in some products. I also make sure that my safe products can also create a fantastic flawless look up-close as well as on the print and film. My recommendation for the bridal makeup is a line of professional products that are safe, flash proof, stay-on, and manually brushed or sponged on the skin. As far as air brush makeup goes I only recommend only a certain type of canned air brush makeup which I use in some occasions. I do not recommend any air injector air brush makeup for a bridal application. In my opinion and experience it looks heavy on the face, the products are risky (skin rash) and it does not hold as well as some other products. Just because it is called air brush makeup, doesn’t mean it creates air brushed and flawless look.

           

·    Dry rubbing won’t make it transfer; on the other hand, if it does become wet thru crying or sweating, you run the risk of it streaking … with airbrush makeup, if the makeup for any reason gets wet and leaves a streak, there is nothing than can be done to blend it.

 

·    Even airbrushing over the area will not blend the streak. The solution to this problem is to constantly be aware of any wetness and to maintain it throughout the day by dabbing your tear ducts and remaining cool so you don’t sweat heavily.

              Sherrie Long Make-up artist USA:

           http://www.california-wedding-ideas.com/bridal-airbrush-makeup.html

“I have been airbrushing for 15 years and I always find it so funny some people lead brides to believe it is better.

I don't recommend it because the makeup has to be diluted with alcohol to go through the compressor, which can dry the skin.

As makeup artists, we use airbrushes on set (on photo shoots or movies) if we need a quick application, body makeup, or special effect makeup.

I would never use it for something as detailed as a bride, because the makeup gets sprayed on, so it just sits on top of the skin, where as with a liquid foundation, you can blend it to make it look like it is skin (hope this makes sense).”

 

           http://makeupartistpro.com/weddingtips/index.html  

“As far as airbrush makeup goes, I only recommend a certain type of canned air brush makeup which I use in some occasions. I do not recommend any air-injector airbrush makeup for a bridal application. In my opinion and experience it looks heavy on the face, the products are risky (skin rash) and it does not hold as well as some other products. Just because it is called airbrush makeup, doesn’t mean it creates an air brushed and flawless look.”

 

           http://mizairmez.blogspot.com/2007/01/some-pre-wedding-day-makeup-preparation.html

·     Some makeup artists may use alcohol in their spray mixture - while this provides increased resistance to sweat, it's not always suitable for sensitive skins. Discuss this with the artist.

 

           http://www.aisledash.com/2008/04/18/should-you-use-airbrush-make-up-on-your-wedding-day/

·     More often than not only the foundation is airbrushed onto the face, blush, lip and eye colour is not airbrushed, but brushes are used instead, because it is extremely difficult to be accurate in smaller areas of the face with airbrushing. 


·     Primer already has silicone in it then you apply normal foundation afterwards.


·    Once the airbrush make up is on, it is very hard to touch up and so if you cry, sweat, blow your nose, etc then you will automatically take some of the makeup layers off and the only way to touch it up is to remove that little area and re-airbrush it again. Not ideal for weddings because of this.


·   The only down side is that you have to apply a separate concealer afterwards since the airbrush will only do foundation, eye shadow and blush. 


·     You can't even powder your face for touch ups once it's on. 


·     There are so many foundations on the market that get you the "airbrush" look without it being airbrushed. 


·    There is a lot of debate in the industry on which of those paints is actually safe for both the artist as well as the person being painted. 


·    I know that compressed air can be dangerous if directed at the skin at too high a pressure and in too fine a stream.

 

·    A good compressor, a good air brush to find out that you can easily invest well over a $1000, never mind airbrush face paints. You can buy a cheap compressor and air brush but you will quickly find out the results are terrible.


·    One needs to figure out either where to plug in that compressor or where to lug that heavy canister of propellant on location if you are a makeup artist.


·     Expensive for the client- Airbrush Make-up session $80 to $200. 


·     Set up fee for airbrush technician: $500 to $800 and there is a club you need to join for $30 per month.


·     You pay for additional supplies at least 6 weeks b4 receiving the product.


·   You can’t use any other product but Luminess Airs' product or else you void warranty- Warranty lasts only 3 months.


·    The initial make-up package has only 4 different shades; even if you advise the manufacturers of the shade you would prefer and the hoses also have to be replaced.


·     Reaching the manufacturers & Customer Service is TERRIBLE! If you dial the toll free number, you are placed on hold forever. If you try contacting them by e-mail there is still no response and the customer service is lousy.


·    Coverage requires more than the few drops they say it will take. It is so expensive that you often find professional air brush face painters that apply a sponge/cake make up for the base and then add the detail with their airbrush.

 

·     It requires a skilled technician/artist or a lot of home practice

 

·    With an air brush, when you consider the set up and clean up, it is very unlikely that you would want to accept any events that are not AT LEAST 3 hours long.

 

·    In today's climate, if the client opens her eyes and you miss-spray in the eye, you could have a law suit on your hands.

 

·    Airbrush face paints should be done in a well ventilated area. Many people, who have attended makeup classes elsewhere, were having some pretty severe respiratory problems. Some of these lasted well into the next several days. If it is that bad after one or two hours of exposure what would the results be if a makeup artist were face painting all day long?

 

·     It’s hard to see the makeup go on as you spray it -- you just have to trust that it's working. 


·    If you have your own airbrush, it’s impossible to aim it at your face and still spray accurately, you always need someone to do it for you. 


·    It is hard for me to determine the correct colour --I am pretty light skinned. One color was too yellow. It does not seem to cover well even when I use 20 drops. You can still see small lines around the eyes. The instructions are minimal. There is no information on covering blotches, moles, etc.

 

·    For a makeup artist, it’s more bulk to travel with. Most makeup artists don’t yet use this method, so you’ll pay a little more for it. 


·    For areas that are more troublesome you might have to use more foundation which can be a hassle because the bottles they send you are TINY.


·   Bought the Luminess Pro a week ago. Not happy at all and it was the biggest waste of money. Problems: Foundation is of poor quality. No coverage.

 

·     I did find that I need to blot the makeup on with my finger under my eyes. The air brush tool does not get into the fine lines under the eyes.


·    Airbrushed makeup really settles into ANY fine lines you have on your face, so if you do have some be sure to apply a primer first.


·     If you have even the slightest bit of fuzz on your face, airbrush makeup is NOT for you. The makeup settles on the fuzz and makes it much more noticeable.


·     If you’re someone with heavy acne this won't be the best product for you. You would be going through a bottle of foundation each application. 


·     Stopping in the middle to add more makeup is kind of a pain. I think total time invested start to finish was nearly 20 minutes... and on a normal day, I spend less than 5 on foundation.

 

·     Nothing is more frustrating for the face painter than clogs, and clogs do happen. 


·     Says an owner of an airbrush machine: “Can I see myself getting up early for work to use this every day? I'm not sure; the novelty may wear off pretty quickly”. 


·     Samples sent with product were just that, SAMPLES. If you have splotchy skin you should be just fine. But, if you have acne, be prepared to go through the foundation much faster. 


·     It’s a hassle to set up if you take it apart every time.


·     Requires cleaning after switching from blush to bronzer etc. (luckily cleaning only takes 30 seconds but it can add up after foundation, bronzer, blush, shimmer)


  Kryolan’s airbrush makeup Q & A

http://www.xmission.com/~spl_efx/makeup/ab_faq.html

 

Q. I was told your makeup is "Hypoallergenic" is that true?
A.
No. Some of our makeup is perfume free, which means is doesn't have the fragrance some people react to. If you have sensitive skin please test the product on the inside of your arm and wait for a reaction. If you have problems please don't use it.

 

Q. That leads to another question, should I wear a mask of some sort?
A. Of course. The product labelling should give you the right NIOSH respirator to use with your paint. Federal law requires this information to be printed on any product that is hazardous such as the temporary tattoo paints.

 

Q. Is regular airbrush makeup harmful?

A. Remember you are the one who is experiencing chronic exposure to airborne particulates, not your customer. The safety of airbrush makeup is always in a state of debate and it will probably take several years before the truth emerges. Just use reasonable safety precautions.

 

Q. Is this stuff OK on my hair?
A.
Don't use red or yellow on treated hair. I don't know what the result is, but the product you buy should be labelled with that warning. The worry is FD&C Red #40 which will stain more than any other pigment.


 Comments from airbrush clients:

 

·     Word of advice, do NOT get airbrush blush or eye makeup. If you choose to do it, just do the face. I find the airbrush blush made me look old and tanned. And once it's on, you can't get it off unless you rub really hard.

      http://chineseweddings.theknot.com/boards/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=48989371


·     I had a makeup trial with airbrushing and about 3 - 4 hrs later I noticed lines on my forehead and around my eyes (a la Rachel Zoe).  Without makeup, I don't have these lines, so I'm guessing it's from general facial movements as opposed to settling in fine lines (at least I hope so).


·     I had airbrush makeup done at my trial (with Patricia LeJeune) and didn't find it any less sweat-proof during our engagement photo shoot. I looked about as shiny as I normally do with regular foundation.
Actually, I couldn't really tell the difference between airbrush and regular makeup - I thought it was going to be more natural looking and less “makeuppy”, but it was just as heavy as regular foundation.


·     Ok if you want to have airbrushing done... Your wedding day is not the day to have it done... I have done airbrushing in the past and the slight hug from a relative is a guarantee that your relative is going to wear on the clothes... It just doesn't hold right...


·     I had trials done both airbrushed and regular.  With the regular it looked less pasted on and more natural.  I couldn't see much of a benefit and the airbrush actually got all over the floor and her hands and was such a mess I couldn't even begin to see that anywhere near my dress the day of!

http://people.boston.com/forums/lifestyle/weddings/vendors/?p=discussiondetails&activityid=7951949425526539068

 

Sally Hansen Fast & Flawless Airbrush Makeup Nude review:


     ·     I picked up this foundation, hoping that the airbrushing effect would hide blemishes on my light skin, without heavy application. I do like the coverage of the foundation, but the airbrush application was not effective. It actually caused more trouble, by spraying on my hair or on areas I don’t want it. I still needed to use a sponge (my preferred method of foundation application) to blend the foundation into my skin. To be fair, the package does mention blending, but I had hoped the airbrush application would be more effective.

           http://www10.epinions.com/reviews/Sally_Hansen_Fast_Flawless_Airbrush_Makeup_Nude_Tan

 

·     So why don't I use this foundation more? It only comes in like 5 shades, and that's supposed to cover the whole gamut of skin tones out there. Creamy Natural is the closest shade for me, but it is still a shade and a half too dark. By far, the worst thing about SH's Airbrush Makeup is the lack of shade choice. The coverage is not sheer enough so that you could get by with a "so-so" shade. From others' reviews though, it sounds like a lot of the shades are kind of orangey or otherwise weird.

      http://leftoverluncheonmeat.blogspot.com/2006/05/product-review-sally-hansen-airbrush.html

 

Traditional Makeup - What is it?:

http://www.bevainlasvegas.com/artistnotes/makeupcomp.html

 Pancake, liquid, cream, or pressed powder that is usually applied with a sponge or finger tips. Traditional makeup comes in the widest variety of any other makeup, with every shade available. It’s also the most versatile of all the makeup; it can be as basic as a sheer tint of coverage, or combined with other properties to create a makeup that targets specific problems.

How it’s used: This particular makeup is the only makeup that, given the appropriate formula is chosen, can be used in any situation at any given time. It can be applied many different ways, from brush methods used with thicker foundations, to finger tips used for light and well blended applications. Women with dry or mature skin benefit from the thicker of the traditional foundations. As their skin typically needs large amounts of hydration, the oils that compose of a cream based foundation lend kindly to their skin, creating a smoother finish. Young adult women tend to prefer a more liquid, oil free foundation or a pressed powder with good coverage. The formula that suits you best would be based on your skin type, and with many more options to be listed than could possible fit into this article. And although, like its main competitor airbrush, it typically does rub off slightly or fade a little over the course of the day, it is highly bendable therefore anything can be fixed within seconds.

It’s my personal belief, off the record, that this is the most versatile, therefore the best option, for wedding makeup - D. Amelia Cline.